-to lay / to lie-

Nota d'uso
Fra i parlanti di madrelingua inglese è abbastanza frequente l'uso erroneo delle forme di to lay (lay, laying, laid, laid) al posto di quelle di to lie (2) (lie, lying, lay, lain) con il significato di giacere, essere disteso (o coricato, sdraiato): You'd better lay (corretto: You'd better lie) on the bed, faresti bene a stenderti sul letto; He was laying (corretto: was lying) on the pavement, era disteso sul marciapiede.

English-Italian dictionary. 2013.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Lay — Lie Lie, v. i. [imp. {Lay} (l[=a]); p. p. {Lain} (l[=a]n), ({Lien} (l[imac] [e^]n), Obs.); p. pr. & vb. n. {Lying}.] [OE. lien, liggen, AS. licgan; akin to D. liggen, OHG. ligen, licken, G. liegen, Icel. liggja, Sw. ligga, Dan. ligge, Goth. ligan …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Lie — Lie, v. i. [imp. {Lay} (l[=a]); p. p. {Lain} (l[=a]n), ({Lien} (l[imac] [e^]n), Obs.); p. pr. & vb. n. {Lying}.] [OE. lien, liggen, AS. licgan; akin to D. liggen, OHG. ligen, licken, G. liegen, Icel. liggja, Sw. ligga, Dan. ligge, Goth. ligan,… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • lay, lie — Lay means to place and is a transitive verb requiring an object. Lie, in the context here, means to recline, is intransitive, and takes no object. I shall lay the rug on the floor. Please lie down here. The principal parts of lay are lay, laid,… …   Dictionary of problem words and expressions

  • lay — Ⅰ. lay [1] ► VERB (past and past part. laid) 1) put down, especially gently or carefully. 2) put down and set in position for use. 3) assign or place: lay the blame. 4) (lay before) present (material) for consideration and action to …   English terms dictionary

  • lie — lay, lie These two words cause confusion even to native speakers of English because their meanings are related and their forms overlap. Lay is a transitive verb, i.e. it takes an object, and means ‘to place on a surface, to cause to rest on… …   Modern English usage

  • lie — Ⅰ. lie [1] ► VERB (lying; past lay; past part. lain) 1) be in or assume a horizontal or resting position on a supporting surface. 2) be or remain in a specified state. 3) reside or be found. 4) …   English terms dictionary

  • lay — lay, lie These two words cause confusion even to native speakers of English because their meanings are related and their forms overlap. Lay is a transitive verb, i.e. it takes an object, and means ‘to place on a surface, to cause to rest on… …   Modern English usage

  • lay —  , lie  Lay and lie, in all their manifestations, are a constant source of errors. There are no simple rules for dealing with them. You must either commit their various forms to memory or avoid them altogether. The forms are as follows:  lay lie… …   Bryson’s dictionary for writers and editors

  • lie — lie1 W1S2 [laı] v past tense lay [leı] past participle lain [leın] present participle lying third person singular lies ▬▬▬▬▬▬▬ 1¦(flat position)¦ 2¦(exist)¦ 3¦(place)¦ 4¦(future)¦ …   Dictionary of contemporary English

  • lay — I [[t]leɪ[/t]] v. laid, lay•ing, n. 1) to put or place in a horizontal position or position of rest; set down: to lay a book on a desk[/ex] 2) to knock or beat down, as from an erect position; strike or throw to the ground: One punch laid him… …   From formal English to slang

  • lay — I. verb (laid; laying) Etymology: Middle English leyen, from Old English lecgan; akin to Old English licgan to lie more at lie Date: before 12th century transitive verb 1. to beat or strike down with force 2. a. to put or set down …   New Collegiate Dictionary


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